Summary Of An Event Apart DC Day 1

The Event Apart conference series is the top-notch gathering for people who make websites. Making its way across various cities in the U.S., the Event Apart tour stopped in Washington, D.C., which I was fortunate enough to attend. The speakers themselves were amazing but interacting with the attendees in real-time during the talks opened a whole new level to the experience. Below are some of the best tweets I curated from each of the sessions. All of which came from afeedapart.com, the official feed aggregator for An Event Apart.

Web 2.1: The Medium Comes of Age by Jeffery Zeldman

Zeldman started things off with a presentation covering the history of communication from the printing press to HTML5, and everything in between. In 2010, standards based design is no longer fringe, HTML5/CSS3 are viable technologies, and the mobile web is taking shape.

  • The death of the web is greatly exaggerated. @tomkruk
  • If the web is dead, then print must be mummified. @Merlaak
  • “There are 241 newsgroups on 1986. 240 are porn…” @grum_dot_com
  • Zeldman calls the telegraph The Victorian Internet @eduiconf
  • R. Cailliau – leading man’s best friend. Worked with Tim Berners-Lee to invent the web. @mad_sunshine
  • 1991 AOL… remember 9600 baud modem? = yuck @lavinia
  • “there’s a history of the internet being ugly and being designed by people who can’t design their way out of a paper bag” @ashleyjoost
  • 1993. Mosaic. We’ve come a long way. #aea http://yfrog.com/jcem8mj @eTapWeb
  • I remember using MOSAIC on my Amiga 500, wondering why “forms” are not showing… @tomkruk
  • And you had to PAY for Netscape @cityrider49
  • Netscape Gold FTW! @tomkruk
  • Zeldman breaking down landmark moments in web history: “1995 brings us the tiled background” @mattmediadc
  • “IE no longer sucks, IE is awesome” – Zeldman, #aea … hear it from the man! @franksedivy
  • 1998 — internet traffic doubles every 100 days @ashleyjoost
  • the phrase “best viewed…” should be left to history @cityrider49
  • dot com bust = coming off a coke bender @tonyvia
  • 2000 dot com bubble burst brought us benefits: people were forced to learn standards, improve their skills to make a difference. @mihswat
  • The CSS Zen Garden changed my professional career… Design for the web became a whole different concept @mattmediadc
  • “you can’t burn every house down because we have this new idea for architecture” @TheTroz
  • XHTML 2.0 was burning every house in the world just to propose a new architecture. @mihswat
  • “HTML5. You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.” @eTapWeb

Object Oriented CSS by Nicole Sullivan

Nicole developed a technique for managing CSS called Object Oriented CSS. The basic premise is to recognize visual patterns and mark them up consistently. Consistent markup results in more compact and efficient CSS code to style which in turn results in more manageable code and faster performing websites.

  • If you write CSS for any site of significant size or traffic you MUST hear @stubbornella talk on OOCSS. This is my second time listen. @aebsr
  • Reason for CSS optimization, CSS Blocks progressive rendering @eduiconf
  • 42% of Alexa’s Top 1000 don’t gzip CSS. 44% have more than 2 files. 56% serve with cookies. 62% don’t minify. 21% have > 100k of CSS. @mihswat
  • “Our sites are choking on the amount of CSS we’re throwing over the wire.” @eTapWeb
  • OOCSS makes me intellectually erect @grum_dot_com
  • Object oriented CSS sound a lot more complicated than it really is. @kingkool68
  • wow around May 2009 FaceBook had over 700 CSS files that totaled more than 1.9Mb @160mph
  • “If you fighting your CSS, your architecture failed” @franksedivy
  • Facebook has all of their headings bold. Non-bolded headings looked weird to users. @kingkool68
  • People aren’t viewing your home page or reading your about section anymore. It’s all Google hit-and-runs, and it’s changing our design. @brian_klaas
  • Css objects were better for humungo sites like Facebook. Seems overkill for smaller, simple sites. @kingkool68
  • Dust-me Selectors to find unused css. http://www.sitepoint.com/dustmeselectors/ @chrismjones
  • A ‘giant pink heading’ should not become a ‘small blue heading’ when placed in another part of the site. @phej
  • Elements should be styled globally, avoiding area-dependent declarations in CSS. Rules should be predictable, avoid overwriting them. @mihswat
  • Love how @stubbornella uses the story of the lady who swallowed a fly in relation to CSS @candiRSX
  • Writing CSS to correct previous bad CSS is the legacy of the old woman who swallowed a fly. It makes sense when @stubbornella says it. @achellios
  • Nicole Sullivan’s Grids on github – http://wiki.github.com/stubbornella/oocss/grids @Merlaak
  • Classing elements with element names (“.h1”) is one step removed from or similar. @jgarber
  • hmmmm…not sure about @stubbornella rec. on eg h3.h6 Isn’t that sort of hacky? Shouldn’t we re-examine design first? @ryanhoonlaverty
  • Among Alexa’s Top 1000, there’s a site with 511 declarations setting styles for h1-h6. Facebook used to have 958. @mihswat
  • After a CSS rewrite, there were only 25 declarations. @mihswat
  • Amen to the underscore hack. I use it all the time. @kingkool68
  • Avoid styling IDs. IDs are for JavaScript. @mihswat
  • styling IDs messes up specificity @eduiconf
  • “You should definitely suffer if you use hacks” @chrismjones
  • Not sure about this ‘not styling IDs’ and have class driven styles .that on top of the things aren’t semantic (.h1, .h2 etc…) … :/ @franksedivy
  • “AVOID !IMPORTANT – except on leaf nodes” Good advice!! @JudyBad
  • “I try to get specificity out-of-the-way so my cascade can really shine.” @andysherry
  • agree with not using !important, disagree with not styling IDs. style IDs if they’re used sparingly or if “lead nodes”. @courcelan
  • Styling using IDs, !importants, and too many nested elements is like fighting whose CSS rules are going to win. @mihswat
  • who knew? the way I wrote CSS as a n00b was on the right path – lots of class selectors and few element/ID selectors! @raelehman
  • I think OO CSS takes the art and craft away from CSS and gets it ready for consumers world! 🙁 @franksedivy
  • The blinking cursor says, “You don’t remember anything.” (Referring to the command line) @Merlaak
  • Find and replace is really why I use Dreamweaver as my coding tool of choice. No need to figure out grep. @kingkool68
  • See how many times a declaration if when your css from command line. grep -r font-size . | wc -l @chrismjones
  • Hmm, @stubbornella‘s OO approach to CSS preso has some good QA tricks, but her philosophy has too much scaffolding for general use @talbs
  • Feeling a little weird about @stubbornella‘s approach to object-oriented CSS, but liking some ideas about finding duplication. @graphicsgirl
  • OOCSS sounds like the best approach for Facebook, but not most sites we design and build. @graphicsgirl
  • afraid newbs will get the wrong idea with @stubbornella‘s methodology and not consider scale/context/semantics @talbs
  • I found taking the general idea from this presentation and building a custom framework for our approach to build sites worked great @aeaattendee
  • Looking at CSS in a way I never have thanks to @stubbornella @TheTroz
  • Facebook reduced CSS size by 19% and HTML size by 44% after optimizations @mihswat
  • * and _ hacks > conditional statements @160mph
  • Been using OOCSS for the past year and a half. Have never found a site that did not benefit. @chrismjones

The CSS3 Experience by Dan Cederholm

Dan emphasizes that sites don’t need to look and behave exactly the same in every browser. Case in point, he owns http://dowebsitesneedtolookexactlythesameineverybrowser.com/ and http://dowebsitesneedtobeexperiencedexactlythesameineverybrowser.com/. CSS3 is available in modern browsers today and suitable for non-critical elements of a design. His presentation consisted of several demos showcasing how CSS3 could be used to sweeten interfaces.

Mobile First! by Luke Wroblewski

Luke covered designing Web applications for mobile platforms first before the desktop. This helps you focus a website down to its bare essentials and functionality. The mobile web is exploding, and in some cases, is the only access someone has to the Internet.

  • “Web products should be designed for mobile first, even if no mobile version is planned.” @eTapWeb
  • desktop internet devices: 1 billion, mobile devices: 10 billion @tonyvia
  • “50% of people who were new to the web last year were on mobile devices.” @eTapWeb
  • Why build mobile first? More growth and future users. @tyrale
  • Mobile Web growth has outpaced desktop Web growth 8x. Smartphone sales will pass PC sales in 2011. @mihswat
  • Mobile is the new black @JudyBad
  • Great mobile products are created never ported. @kingkool68
  • mobile stats from #lukew http://lukew.com/ff/ @eduiconf
  • “27% of searches on Yelp! come from 4% of users (i.e. the users who access Yelp! via iPhone.)” @zeldman
  • “Designing for mobile forces you to focus and prioritize.” @eTapWeb
  • Moving from desktop to mobile… First remove 80% of the crap @tyrale
  • Design for mobile first and you will get down to the things that matter. @mad_sunshine
  • “everything else on this page needs to pixelate and die.” @courcelan
  • Mobile devices’ limited screen size makes you focus on what’s important – main features, straight communication. @mihswat
  • Use vector to design for the web, build with css3 it will scale automagically! @tyrale
  • Mobile design is all about adaption @kingkool68
  • for mobile, make the content the UI @rkunboxed
  • 100ms delay results in 1% sales loss for Amazon ($191 Million) @eduiconf
  • Google says 500ms delay drops search traffic by 20%. Wonder what our 8,000ms server hangs do. Cough. @itmaybejj
  • optimize for mobile:speed eg, eliminate redirects & use app cache for local content storage @dinalew
  • Mobile is quick bursts, and mostly at home on usage. @tyrale
  • Your mobile is with you all the time, so designing for mobile means designing something that can be used all the time. @zeldman
  • Only make content and web apps that are useful to people *all the time @halvorson
  • People spend only about 2 to 4 seconds on a webpage using a mobile device. Optimize your site for this behavior. @mihswat
  • design = constraining until an elegant solution presents itself @lavinia
  • Many users will interact with mobile devices using one hand and one thumb (one-handed touch), so the UI has to be simple. @jessicaivins
  • 1 million per day = touch based phone purchase @lavinia
  • mobile: must accommodate “french fry fingers” @JudyBad
  • wow. ‘1.1 billion consumers with Nokia devices in 2009’ @westerndave
  • 8-10mm = average human finger pad , so design for 9mm touch area @lavinia
  • touch me = Touch Gesture Reference Guide http://www.lukew.com/ff/entry.asp?1071 @westerndave
  • Hovers are not intentional, clicks are @eduiconf
  • great stat: People spend only about 2 to 4 seconds on a webpage using a mobile device. Optimize your site for this behavior. @lavinia
  • Hovers are not intentional. Just because a user’s mouse has paused somewhere doesn’t mean they expect to see a menu. @zeldman
  • most devices use wifi for location (gps is narly indoors) @lavinia
  • Yes! Hover cannot be considered an intentional interaction on a mobile device. I activate them accidentally on my *desktop*. @kissane
  • Yelp’s augmented reality feature boosted their sustained traffic by 40 to 50 percent @mihswat
  • Wonderful presentation from Luke Wroblewski. This really jives with a lot of stuff that get talked about in IxD these days. @iwilsonjr

Message and Medium: Better Content by Design by Kristina Halvorson

Kristina sure knows how to develop a killer content strategy. A website’s message carries through to other places on the web than just the main website. Customer support, social media, and meta data should all echo the tone of the main message. And there is a lot more to a good content strategy than determining what text goes on the front page. How will this content be produced? Who will update it? How often will we add new content?

  • Kristina Halvorson (@halvorson) asked us to sing Happy Birthday to her son. How sweet… @shiota
  • @halvorson on two of my favorite topics: teeth & content strategy! @dinalew
  • haha. User-scented content. “Smells like user.” @ryanhoonlaverty
  • Content strategy plans for the creation, delivery, and governance of content that people care about. @eTapWeb
  • website content: stop talking about what you do and talk about what your users want. hello user-centered content @dinalew
  • content requirements ≠ content strategy @tonyvia
  • content strategy = content (substance + structure) & people (workflow + governance) @tonyvia
  • messaging is not a mission statement, brand promise or tagline @eduiconf
  • nobody cares about your mission statement [so true!] @tonyvia
  • First second visiting a website is an emotional response @kingkool68
  • user forms an impression of your site in ONE SECOND (load time + design) & decides to trust you or not within 10 seconds @tonyvia
  • In 1 second user should have an emotional response. 10 seconds, understand your primary message. 2 minutes, secondary msg. @eTapWeb
  • Reminded of how some of the traditional #ux roles/deliverables can suffocate copywriters’ creativity/skills. Preach on, @havlorson. @talbs
  • Include maintenance requirements for key pages – great content strategy idea @graphicsgirl
  • Consistency inspires trust in your readers. @JudyBad
  • consistency inspires trust in your readers @lavinia
  • Visiting every page of your site with its main message in mind helps to see if you’re communicating it the right way with consistency @mihswat
  • #aea is really driving home the importance to collaboration across roles/disciplines to tackle those important grey areas of an experience! @talbs
  • And your FAQ page is inconsistent. Where’s the fun, Ben & Jerry? @mad_sunshine
  • pet peeve: “contact us” page hiding phone/address 10 layers deep. after all, that’s all we want from “contact us” page 99% of the time @sarahdippity
  • Workflow and governance are crucial for good content strategy. @kingkool68
  • “whats our facebook strategy?” “that depends… what are you trying to do, who’s going to do [keep up with it]?” hear, hear. @courcelan
  • What is your social media strategy? Is it successfully delivering your message? Or do you have a Twitter just for the sake of it? @mihswat
  • Page descriptions. Tweets. Facebook posts. Google results. Your message should be consistently delivered everywhere. @mihswat
  • @halvorson‘s talks on content strategy are ALWAYS timely and poignant. Maybe because content strategy is a never-ending struggle… @ryanhoonlaverty

Anatomy of a Design Decision by Jared Spool

Jared pointed out that every site on the web came to be from a series of decisions. He has identified 5 styles to design decisions and when each style might be appropriate for a given project. Oh and university homepages feature images of girls under trees way too much.

  • Seen it before, but it’s easy to forget just how awesome http://havenworks.com/ is… @davidocoulter
  • “it validates” – Jared Spool (sarcastically referring to havenworks.com) @SethBlanchard
  • “Someone actually designed this on purpose. This way.” – @jmspool on a particularly egregious web design specimen. @alykat
  • Sites like havenworks.com or arngren.net went over design decisions. Now that’s something to think about. @shiota
  • Jared is talking about the famous 37signals vs. Donald Norman “celebrity deathmatch”. @shiota
  • “Self design works great when you’re designing something for your own use, or for use by people just like you.” @eTapWeb
  • Crappy and unhelpful error messages are the perfect way to frustrate your user. @shiota
  • Unintentional design happens on its own. Works great if user will put up with whatever or we don’t care about support costs. @eTapWeb
  • Airline websites: helping AEA speakers make their point since 2005 @ryanhoonlaverty
  • “Genius design: when we’ve previously learned what users need. We’re solving the same problems repeatedly.” @eTapWeb
  • “Activity Focused Design: designing for new activities unfamiliar to us.” @eTapWeb
  • Well @jmspool‘s talk includes a reference to @lingscars‘ website www.lingscars.com… and well, just check it out. @hellogeri
  • Jared is comparing Six Flags map to Disney World’s map. Both amusement parks, yet totally different maps. Each with its own focus. @mihswat
  • Disney. Someone has thought about what happens between the rides. Thinking about the experience. @mad_sunshine
  • experience is the stuff that happens around usage. @lavinia
  • “User experience is what happens in between activities” @simplebits
  • University website traps — girl under trees. WOW! So many of them… @mad_sunshine
  • OMG I can’t search – the search box is on the left [side]! @raelehman
  • Rule #17: Always put the search box in the upper right @grum_dot_com
  • Hmm. design style guides and guidelines never work. @mad_sunshine
  • Informed Decisions > Rule-based Decisions @160mph
  • Rule-based decisions prevent thinking. Informed decisions require thinking. @sarahdippity
  • Design is about the exception cases. If everything was always the same, we would not be interested in this work. @beep
  • Instead of spreading dogmas/methodologies, try spreading tricks/techniques. People will learn, think, and won’t struggle with rules @mihswat

BarCampDC 3 Recap

This past Saturday, November 14th, a hundred DC tech enthusiasts gathered at the Martin Luther King Library to create their own conference. Topics were suggested by participants and the group at large determined the schedule. It was a BarCamp at it’s best!

The final schedule as picked by the particpants at BarCamp DC

Large crowd at BarCamp DC 3

This year’s BarCamp had a few twists. The word ‘Twitter’ was banned and anyone violating that rule had to pay a dollar to the Twitter swear jar which was donated to charity. The other rule was no PowerPoint slides which was an effort to promote group discussions and participation over lectures.

I got to catch up with former co-workers from USNews as well as other DC tech-heads I met at other local events. The entire event including lunch was free of charge thanks to the generous sponsors who helped make BarCampDC possible. The pizza was quite good.

Typical techie BarCamp food: PIZZA!

Some of the talks I went to included:

Russell Heimlich and John Chen during the How To Play Tetris talk at BarCamp DC 3.

How To Play Tetris led by John Chen. John didn’t actually think anyone was interested in his talk but we had a good-size group talking about video game politics, strategies for Tetris, and the fact that there are Tetris pros making US$100k per year in Korea. The key takeaway was being good at Tetris takes practice, practice, and more practice. And after you’ve practiced some more, you wake up one day and realize you’re good at Tetris.

An Introduction to the Android Platform Gyuri Grell and Zvi Band led an introduction to the Android mobile OS platform. The talk was a little over my head as it was mostly about Java, which I know nothing about. The source code for Meetro DC, the DC Metro app demoed, can be found on GitHub for anyone to poke around and play with. I did enjoy seeing from a high level how Android apps work and shedding some light on the magic running behind the scenes. I’m really excited to see where Android goes in the future.

The most thought-provoking talk I sat in was Generalist vs. Specialist led by Kelly Gifford. It was such an open-ended topic that spurred a healthy debate. From my point of view you are both a generalist and specialist depending on what level you are comparing to. For example, in your company you might be the only “web person”, making you a specialist but with so many different hats to wear in a sole-developer position, you have to do many different things making you a generalist. Like most anything in life, nothing is cut and dry black and white but a lot of gray areas.

Ryan McGrath is in a unique situation at his job at Webs.com.  He is in charge of Improving the Performance of the Frontend for millions of sites hosted there.  Crufty code, too much JavaScript, and a less-than-ideal backend issue are some of the problems plaguing his pursuit for excellence. An engineer from Clearspring, which distributes billions of page views of widgets all across the web,  was in the room and provided some great insight into tuning performance for large-scale sites. They talked about some geeky stuff like serving images as base64 strings instead of binary data which can yield some performance gains. I was pretty much lost after that.

The final talk of the day was about TemlarPHP, a cascading template framework built with PHP. It separates presentation from content to create websites that are easy to maintain and standards complaint with the need for a database. It was created by Shawn Brown and looked like a lighter alternative compared to the other feature-packed, and somewhat bloated, web frameworks out there.

Russell Heimlich discussing frontend tips at BarCamp DC

Like the past two DC BarCamps, I gave a talk. The topic was HTML/CSS/JavaScript Tips & Tricks which I have picked up over the past few years and thought were worth sharing. I felt it was one of my best presentations as my talking points came to me naturally with code details to back up what I was saying. I was stoked to see so many people show up to hear what I had to say as well as contribute a few points of their own. Shaun Farrell managed to capture video from a part of my talk.

So as you can see there was a lot going on. There were so many other presentations I wanted to see and people I wanted to meet and chat with but there just wasn’t enough time. A big thanks goes out to the organizers (@jfc3 , @thorpus, @corbett3000, @farrelley, @patricktimony & all the others) that helped put on another great DC tech event.

Other BarCamp DC Resources

DC Tech Events For Fall

The DC tech scene is just bursting at the seams with interesting (and free) tech events and un-conferences coming up this fall. I don’t know If I will be able to attend them all but here are a few that made it on to my radar.

Accessibility Camp DC Logo
Accessibility Camp DC is taking place at Martin Luther King Library on October 10, 2009. The event will cover topics and discussions about making the web more accessible.

Public Media Camp Logo
PublicMediaCamp will be at American University on October 17 and 18, 2009. The event aims to put 100 developers, 100 public media supporters, and 100 people who work for public broadcasting companies in a room and see what comes of it.

TedX MidAtlantic Logo
TEDx Midatlantic will be held on November 5, 2009, at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, MD.  The event will feature presentations by many of the leading thinkers and doers in the MidAtlantic Region.

BarCampDC Logo
BarCamp3 is the grand daddy of all DC tech events. It will be at the Martin Luther King Library on November 14, 2009. This is always my favorite event of the year.

PodCampDC 2008

PodCamp DC Opening Keynote

This past weekend I had the great pleasure of attending the very first PodCamp DC. PodCamp is a new media unconference, meaning the participants decide the schedule of events and topics on the day of the conference rather than in advance. There was quite a diverse set of topics ranging from the nuts and bolts of podcasting in Podcasting 101 to an interactive discussion on the future of Social Media and New Journalism. The attendees were just as diverse as the topics from the young techies like myself all the way up to retired grandparents.

One thing that really surprised me was the number of senior citizens at the event. I saw a guy typing away on his Acer laptop running Ubuntu and another lady who looked to be a grandmother wearing a Red Hat Linux baseball cap. I thought the people that attended these things were mostly young computer nerds though I was pleasantly surprised to see people of all gender, color and creed.

Her Flip video camera (atleast that is what I think it is) matched her glasses.
Her Flip video camera (atleast that is what I think it is) matched her glasses.

Probably the most insightful talk of the conference was given by Gretchen Vogelzang of the MommyCast. She talked about how her and a friend turned a simple podcast about motherhood into a six-figure business attracting big name advertisers like Dixie, National Geographic, and Warner Independent films. Gretchen and Paige put a lot of research into their work and it shows with a loyal following that rivals that of a major media property.


Gretchen Vogelzang gave on of the best talks of the conference about how the MommyCast got where it is today.

Gretchen Vogelzang gave on of the best talks of the conference about how the MommyCast got where it is today.

Social Media and New Journalism was a great talk with old media veterans Jim Long (NBC News) and Andy Carvin (NPR) discussing how new media was shaking things up in the traditional news space. They covered the mass propagation of information via Twitter citing the recent Illinois earthquake which quickly spread around the Twitterverse before any traditional news team even had a clue about what was going on.

New tools like Qik let you stream live video over the Internet from your cell phone. While the quality is low there is the ability for people watching the stream to chat and send comments straight to the cell phone creating a new dynamic between producer and consumer. You can see their whole talk which as recorded using Qik below.

Another product mentioned called Utterz lets you call a phone number and leave a voicemail which will be converted and uploaded to the Internet and pushed out as a podcast. Interactive tools like Qik and Utterz make covering an event in near-realtime a possibility.

This dynamic duo talked about how New Media is disrupting journalism. They demoed Qik and Utterz and sparked lots of good ideas from the packed crowd.
This dynamic duo talked about how New Media is disrupting journalism. They demoed Qik and Utterz and sparked lots of good ideas from the packed crowd. See the footage from their talk below.

When lots of geeks get together, a gadget meet-and-greet is sure to happen. I saw a Nokia N810 Internet tablet and Asus Eee PC. Both were small, portable devices for surfing the web in a Wifi-heavy area.


Lots of gadget gawking going on at a geekfest like PodCampDC

Lots of gadget gawking going on at a geekfest like PodCampDC

The rest of the time was about meeting new people and trading ideas. I helped answer a few questions for a guy named Andrew who wanted to run a blog and video podcast all from his Blackberry. Using WordPress and Postie he can accomplish this as he travels around the country. Everyone seemed to be all abuzz about Twitter and I found a few more people to follow although it is getting harder and harder to keep up with all of my followers. I think I will be cutting back some.

Hard Time Hearing
There was so much discussion and exchange of ideas going on.

All in all, PodCamp DC was light on content but heavy on people. I heard a few complaints about the lack of technical podcasting instruction like the New Media Expo of late last year, but that’s what you get with a free, local conference. I know there will be a whole lot more presentations next year! I still had a great time hanging out with fellow web nerds.

You can see the rest of the photos from the day on my Flickr page. And if you want to see all of the pictures from the event just search for the tag ‘podcampdc

If you missed out on this unconference, there is the Social Dev Camp East coming up in 3 weeks. It is on May 10th, 2008, in Baltimore. I’ll be there and if you’ll be there do say hello.

Other PodCamp DC Recaps:

Metro Takes A Peep At YouTube

The Washington D.C. Metrorail system is the second busiest public transit system in the U.S. But when it comes to producing viral videos, Metro is probably the second worst (this video is probably #1) as evidence by this little gem:

You’ve got to give the people working at the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority some credit for reaching out to the people through their own medium, YouTube. Although I think people are passing it around for a good laugh at how cheesy it is and not on how informative it might be.